Author Topic: Composting  (Read 24364 times)

Offline Thermomixer

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Composting
« on: September 06, 2008, 02:08:42 am »
If you compost your veggie scraps, then use the Thermomix to chop it up prior to placing it on the compost heap/bin, makes it break down faster.

I saw this tip originally on the German Hints & Tips website and then Dani at Kitchen playground blogged here
about the idea too.
« Last Edit: September 11, 2008, 11:04:36 am by Thermomixer »
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Offline brazen20au

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Re: Composting
« Reply #1 on: September 07, 2008, 03:44:31 am »
good idea.

i think i'm too lazy for that but i do use the water i wash my porridge out with on my herbs ;)
Karen in Canberra :)
Mum to 3 including one with Coeliac Disease and 2 with autism, aiming for a paleo / AIP diet
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Offline judydawn

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Re: Composting
« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2009, 06:27:23 am »
I use absolutely every drop of water that I rinse my TMX out with due to water restrictions here in South Australia.  I have a bucket permanently in the sink and make many trips out to my garden during the day.  Waste not want not. Must get another bucket for under the sink to put the vegie peelings in and give them a whizz at the end of the day for compost.  See if I can put some goodness into my infertile soil.
Judy from North Haven, South Australia

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Offline CarolineW

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Re: Composting
« Reply #3 on: March 10, 2009, 11:34:20 pm »
I'm a bit of a sad person, really, because I love compost.  I can get quite enthusiastic about it.  But I have to admit that every time I look at my kitchen compost bin and think about tipping it into my TM to blitz, I feel a bit weird about it, and can't quite bring myself to do it.  I think it's because all the 'good' scraps go to our hens.  They are turned into mash in the TM.  But the mouldy stuff goes into the compost bin.  And the thought of putting mouldy things into my TM to blity - ewww.  :P

I guess that the difference is that normal people have what I use for hen mash as their compost  ;D

Not sure where I first heard the compost idea - possibly in Oz, I think ...  Seem to remember the consultant mentioning it, along with making natural pesticides.  Was I jet lagged?!?  I can't believe that I didn't take down details!!!  That's exactly the sort of thing that I'd like to know about.
As my picture shows, I've suddenly become younger :-)  DD was of the opinion that her picture should be here, not mine!

Offline judydawn

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Re: Composting
« Reply #4 on: March 11, 2009, 12:02:18 am »
I can see where you are coming from with the mush in the TM bowl - it looks absolutely disgusting and I tend to want to wash the bowl a lot longer than if it was normal cooking.  Silly really, it is just peelings I'm putting in there with a bit of water to help it mush up.  Our local council is supposed to be providing us with a bin for our vegie scraps pretty soon now and it will all end up as compost but unfortunately for them, they won't be getting any from me now that I know this tip. I just tip it into a barren piece of soil I have around the side of the house but don't know if this will help the soil or not - or do you have to do the complete compost bin thing with layers of this and that.  Can't hurt the soil but will it improve it?  Anyone know the answer to this one?
Judy from North Haven, South Australia

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Offline CarolineW

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Re: Composting
« Reply #5 on: March 11, 2009, 12:11:06 am »
It's absolutely fine to dig a hole and put mush straight into it.  Then cover it with a layer of soil and you're ready for the next layer of mush.  It's called 'trench composting' and is traditionally done over winter, ready for spring planting of beans or any other hungry veg which also need a lot of water.  The layer of soil is mainly to help it to break down quicker, but also to stop it smelling yucky (I believe that's the technical term  :D )

You would want to leave it to break down at least a little bit before planting into it, or else it will be competing with the plants for nitrogen.  It could also get a bit too hot and scorch the seedling.  Leaving it for a couple of weeks before putting a plant in should be fine.

Otherwise, throw it onto a heap.  I know you're supposed to do it in layers, but to be honest, so long as there's a mix of 'green' (plant waste, veg peelings, grass clippings, etc) and 'browns' (leaves, shredded wood, torn up paper, etc) it's absolutely fine.  The golden rule, of course, is to 'turn it' or mix it up in some way once a month, so that plenty of air gets in.  Also, keep it covered so that the heat is maintained.  That way it composts quickly, without yucky smells, and kills the majority if not all of weed seeds, and any disease or nasties generally that were lurking around due to the heat generated.
As my picture shows, I've suddenly become younger :-)  DD was of the opinion that her picture should be here, not mine!

Offline judydawn

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Re: Composting
« Reply #6 on: March 11, 2009, 12:50:54 am »
Trench composting sounds the easiest to me!  I will eventually plant my herbs in that patch but I'm in no hurry to use it immediately so I will continue to bury everything and see how the soil changes over the next few months. My daughter has just bought 3 guinea pigs for her children so I guess I can ask her to bag up the hay/manure mix when she cleans the cage out and put that in there too or would the droppings be no good for the soil.
Judy from North Haven, South Australia

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Offline CarolineW

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Re: Composting
« Reply #7 on: March 12, 2009, 10:51:40 am »
, and kills the majority if not all of weed seeds, and any disease or nasties generally that were lurking around due to the heat generated.

That is, the heat kills them, not that they're lurking around because of the heat  ;D
As my picture shows, I've suddenly become younger :-)  DD was of the opinion that her picture should be here, not mine!

Offline Thermomixer

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Re: Composting
« Reply #8 on: March 17, 2009, 05:04:20 am »
I can see where you are coming from with the mush in the TM bowl - it looks absolutely disgusting and I tend to want to wash the bowl a lot longer than if it was normal cooking.  Silly really, it is just peelings I'm putting in there with a bit of water to help it mush up. 
You could actually use a lot of the scraps in making stock - carrot/veg peel,etc - if you have a big pot sitting on the slow combustion stove in the cold months.  But my other half is exactly the same when I blend bits for compost.  LOL.  Really makes her ill looking at the mush  ;D ;D ;D

 I just tip it into a barren piece of soil I have around the side of the house but don't know if this will help the soil or not - or do you have to do the complete compost bin thing with layers of this and that.  Can't hurt the soil but will it improve it?  Anyone know the answer to this one?
 

As Caroline says - it is beneficial.  Any veg matter added to the soil helps it.  We have a client who has turned hard clay soil in his backyard into the most friable, healthy soil by just doing very basic composting.  It is hard to believe just how rich his soil is compared to the neighbour.  Composting is good for larger chunks to help it break down.  You almost don't need a compost bin and if you are composting, then it is nest not to have it too wet - air needs to circulate to help with the bugs breaking it down.
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Offline brazen20au

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Re: Composting
« Reply #9 on: March 17, 2009, 05:48:49 am »
Quote
We have a client
what do you do thermomix-er?
Karen in Canberra :)
Mum to 3 including one with Coeliac Disease and 2 with autism, aiming for a paleo / AIP diet
My Cooking Blog
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Offline Thermomixer

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Re: Composting
« Reply #10 on: March 17, 2009, 08:16:59 am »
Quote
We have a client
what do you do thermomix-er?

I am a vet and he has dogs - nothing sinister !!!  and no, I'm not on the game !!!

He loves cooking and growing vegies and herbs.  When I went round last year to get some pineapple sage for a friend I was blown away by his yard. 

Professional chefs would have a field day with his garden - only a suburban yard, but the variety of veg and herbs !!!
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Offline judydawn

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Re: Composting
« Reply #11 on: March 17, 2009, 09:37:10 am »
I had to check out where you lived Thermomix-er when I read your reference to the slow combustion stove - felt sure you must have been from overseas somewhere.  No, Melbourne.  That was a surprise. Don't know too many people here with one of those cookers.  My, you have been a busy boy today!
Judy from North Haven, South Australia

Make the most of every day, you never know what is around the corner.

Offline brazen20au

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Re: Composting
« Reply #12 on: March 17, 2009, 09:39:51 am »
wow, a vet! i would never have guessed!!! (seriously, not a clue lol)
Karen in Canberra :)
Mum to 3 including one with Coeliac Disease and 2 with autism, aiming for a paleo / AIP diet
My Cooking Blog
Thermomix Magic Group Blog

Offline Thermomixer

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Re: Composting
« Reply #13 on: March 18, 2009, 05:43:01 am »
wow, a vet! i would never have guessed!!! (seriously, not a clue lol)

LOL -  strange, yes - & I don't use the leftovers from surgery.  ;) ;) ;)
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Offline Thermomixer

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Re: Composting
« Reply #14 on: March 18, 2009, 05:45:32 am »
I had to check out where you lived Thermomix-er when I read your reference to the slow combustion stove - felt sure you must have been from overseas somewhere.  No, Melbourne.  That was a surprise. Don't know too many people here with one of those cookers. 

That was in a house that we had in the country and it really was superb for stocks, casseroles, etc during the winter.  Slow roasting also was great.

My, you have been a busy boy today!

Finally catching up with all the posts.  ;)
Thermomixer in Australia

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http://thermomixmagic.blogspot.com/ - our joint blog in Oz - please feel free to join us.