Author Topic: All About Sour Dough .  (Read 232421 times)

Offline achookwoman

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 19532
    • View Profile
    • Chook woman
All About Sour Dough .
« on: September 03, 2012, 07:58:18 am »
Over the next few days I will try and explain the process of making a starter,  feeding it, storing and using it to make a loaf.  This is based on my experienced and I am not an expert.  but it works for me .

White Flour Starter.
Into a sterile glass jar mix 1/2 cup of bakers flour,  ( strong bread flour ),  with 3/4 cup of FILTERED water.
Place a Chux loosely over the top,  and place in a sheltered place outside.
You are going to capture wild yeast that lives in the air.
Leave for 3 to 4 days ,  to ferment.
You can bring inside now and sit it on the kitchen bench.
If it smells bad ,  chuck out and start again.
When it starts to have small bubbles on top,  stir in 1 tablespoon of flour and 1 tablespoon of Filtered water.
For the following 3 days feed with 1 tablespoon of water and flour.
When the starter is active,  ( with bubbles on the top and smelling a little like beer, ) , transfer to a larger sterile container and feed with equal larger amounts of water and flour.
This can be 1/2 cup of each.
This is to increase the amount of starter for use in following recipe.  ( you will need 400 g of starter.)
You can now use your starter to make bread or screw on top and place in fridge.

More later!!! Think i had better get a move on as we are going away for a week on Saturday.

Instead of going to all this trouble,  you may be able to get a small amount of starter from someone else. If you do,  just put it in a large sterile jar and feed it to increase the volume.

If you leave your starter on the kitchen bench ,  you will need to feed it every day.  Only do this if you intend to make a lot of Sourdough bread., or want to build up the amount of starter.
If you place your starter in the fridge, best fed once a week.  However it will last a lot longer without a feed.  I left mine for 13 weeks last year when we went OS.  I don't recommend this as it took a lot of refreshing.  I think it was sulking. LOL.
When left in fridge it will develop a grey water on top,  just stir this back in and feed it.
When you take your starter out of the fridge and feed it, it needs 7 hours or overnight to become very active.  It is then that you can make your bread.
 
do not use all your starter, leave 1/2 cup in the jar and start feeding it again until you have enough for the next loaf.

Recipes.

It is best to start off simple.

This recipe is adapted to the TMX from 'Bread Revolution',  by Duncan Glendinning and Patrick Ryan.

Place into Tmx bowl,
400g active starter,
500g bread flour
250g warm water, filtered.
2 teaspoons of each salt and sugar.
Knead for 4 mins.
Scrape/pour into lined bread tin. Cover with plastic
Let rise , in a warm place,until at least double. 
Brush with egg wash.
bake in oven 200/220 o C,  with water in dish in bottom of oven.

NOTES
Look at Cookies variation,  for double rise method.
Can place in fridge over night,  then bring back to room temp,  before baking.
This starter is mild in flavour,  but the large amount of starter does not give an over powering sour taste.
The dough is very moist,  and I like to roll it around on a floured SIL mat to make it more manageable.
Make a plain loaf first,  then add seeds or wholemeal flour,  once you understand the method.

Bread sticks made with this recipe,  is as close as I have got to a genuine French Bagette.





« Last Edit: September 05, 2012, 12:00:32 pm by achookwoman »

Offline courton

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1677
    • View Profile
    • Blendstyle
Re: All About Sour Dough .
« Reply #1 on: September 03, 2012, 08:02:31 am »
Ok off to buy filtered water tomorrow!

Offline Cuilidh

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6626
    • View Profile
Re: All About Sour Dough .
« Reply #2 on: September 03, 2012, 08:21:16 am »
Thanks for starting this thread, Chookie.  I know many of us are going to be following your method and enjoying our own sourdough bread before too much longer.
Marina from Melbourne and Guildford
I can resist everything except temptation - Oscar Wilde.

Offline achookwoman

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 19532
    • View Profile
    • Chook woman
Re: All About Sour Dough .
« Reply #3 on: September 03, 2012, 08:24:48 am »


Flour and water mixed and ready to put outside.

Offline achookwoman

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 19532
    • View Profile
    • Chook woman
Re: All About Sour Dough .
« Reply #4 on: September 03, 2012, 08:30:24 am »
Courton,  You can boil some water and let it cool.  I haven't done this but have been told it works.

Photo a bit large,  slide it across to see full photo. 

Online cookie1

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 34599
    • View Profile
Re: All About Sour Dough .
« Reply #5 on: September 03, 2012, 09:15:17 am »
Our water filter died last summer and I do the boiled water, allowed to cool trick. Don't use distilled water, I was told it was a no no.

Chookie thanks for doing this. We appreciate your effort.
May all dairy items in your fridge be of questionable vintage.

https://www.facebook.com/The-Retired-Thermomixer-834601623316983/

Offline courton

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1677
    • View Profile
    • Blendstyle
Re: All About Sour Dough .
« Reply #6 on: September 03, 2012, 09:31:09 am »
Boiled cooled water...even better Chookie!

Offline Shazzy

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 277
    • View Profile
Re: All About Sour Dough .
« Reply #7 on: September 03, 2012, 09:42:43 am »
Thanks Chookie for this thread. I still have sooooo much to learn about sourdough and look forward to reading more.

Offline Very Happy Jan

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1474
    • View Profile
Re: All About Sour Dough .
« Reply #8 on: September 03, 2012, 09:52:23 am »
Thanks Chookie. I got a bit (lot) excited on the retreat weekend when you mentioned putting this process on the Forum. I love sourdough and have often picked Cookie1's brain. Even went to a sourdough class but after listening to you I realise your process is much easier. Looking forward to having a go  :)
Jan.  Perth,  Western Australia
Adolescence is a time of great change. Between the ages of 12 and 17 a parent can age 20 years.

Offline fundj&e

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11255
    • View Profile
Re: All About Sour Dough .
« Reply #9 on: September 03, 2012, 10:58:21 am »
Thanks Chookie, i have started the starter 2 lol
i don't need a recipe i'm italian

Offline goldfish

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5788
  • Love life's little light bulb moments!!
    • View Profile
Re: All About Sour Dough .
« Reply #10 on: September 03, 2012, 11:05:38 am »
Me too . . .  ;D

Offline Aussie Brenda

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2248
    • View Profile
Re: All About Sour Dough .
« Reply #11 on: September 03, 2012, 11:33:13 am »
Going out to boil the jug and start this tomorrow too.

Bonsai

  • Guest
Re: All About Sour Dough .
« Reply #12 on: September 03, 2012, 01:48:34 pm »
My starter is really bubbly and frothy and smells beery but once I use it to make bread the loaf doesn't rise much at all. Tastes good but quite dense even after a very long rising time. I wonder if I'm using enough starter as the recipe I'm using puts 100g starter with about 400g flour and 1 1/2 tsp salt plus water (no sugar). It's yoke's recipe so I figure it should work but I'm growing a brick collection 😔.  Wondering if more starter is required?

Offline achookwoman

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 19532
    • View Profile
    • Chook woman
Re: All About Sour Dough .
« Reply #13 on: September 03, 2012, 03:10:29 pm »
Thereis a new 'revolution' in bread making that uses 400 g starter,  500g flour,  250 g water, 1 teaspoon of each salt and sugar.  It is a pretty slack mix.   If it is too wet to handle, reduce the water a little.
Bonsai, Your starter sounds good ,  so try this recipe.

Online cookie1

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 34599
    • View Profile
Re: All About Sour Dough .
« Reply #14 on: September 04, 2012, 01:29:07 am »
Bonsai I have made lots of Yoke's recipes. Some of them are very 'solid'. Which recipe are you using? If I've made it I can tell you what I found as I usually put my comments in after each loaf.
May all dairy items in your fridge be of questionable vintage.

https://www.facebook.com/The-Retired-Thermomixer-834601623316983/