Author Topic: Using the Thermoserver  (Read 17000 times)

Offline muzzy

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Using the Thermoserver
« on: September 18, 2012, 09:38:37 am »


Hi there,

am new to this world and have a quick question.  I know it is probably silly but how do you actually use the thermoserver to keep stuff warm?

Do you will it with hot water, tip it out and then put the food in?  But then what temp or speed do you set on the machine?  Or do you just sit it on top??

Hopefully someone can explain it to me.

TIA

muzzy

Offline Aussie Brenda

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Re: Using the Thermoserver
« Reply #1 on: September 18, 2012, 09:42:57 am »
Muzzy the thermoserver is mostly used (well by me) to keep the food warm after it is cooked.  If I cook rice I put it in the Thermoserver whilst I'm getting the next recipe ready.  If you make risotto you put it in for a few minutes to thicken up without actually cooking anymore. It is really handy.  Sometimes if it is a cold day I do give it a warm with a rinse of hot water.

*suzanne*

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Re: Using the Thermoserver
« Reply #2 on: September 18, 2012, 09:45:27 am »
It keeps food warm, no need to fill it with hot water or anything, just put your food once cooked into it with the lid on and leave it on the bench.  I have only ever used it for an hour before eating and it has kept the food still hot.
Hope that answers your question xx

Offline goldfish

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Re: Using the Thermoserver
« Reply #3 on: September 18, 2012, 09:48:28 am »
Muzzy - it's also good for making yoghurt - once the cooking is complete just pop the liquid into the thermoserver for a minimum of 5 hours.  We wrap the thermoserver in a large towel for more insulation and let it sit overnight.

It would be great if your consultant could give you more information at the time you receive it on how the server can be used!

Offline Aussie Brenda

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Re: Using the Thermoserver
« Reply #4 on: September 18, 2012, 09:51:51 am »
GF, when you make yoghurt in the thermoserver do you strain it the next day,( I haven't had a go at this yet,) What do you transfer it into?

Offline goldfish

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Re: Using the Thermoserver
« Reply #5 on: September 18, 2012, 11:20:52 am »
No, we've never strained it . . .to be honest, ours goes so quickly that on most occasions we've just kept the thermoserver in the fridge.  Otherwise, I put it in sterilised glass jars.  I heard somewhere that the yoghurt containers (bought yoghurt) might still contain some of the bacteria so we don't use those . ..  don't know the full story, but I reckon you can't go wrong with sterilised glass ;D

Offline Halex

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Re: Using the Thermoserver
« Reply #6 on: September 18, 2012, 11:24:32 am »
GF, when you make yoghurt in the thermoserver do you strain it the next day,( I haven't had a go at this yet,) What do you transfer it into?

No. i leave it overnight & its perfect, ready to eat, but save some for your next batch :)
Mum to Crown Prince......

Offline Aussie Brenda

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Re: Using the Thermoserver
« Reply #7 on: September 18, 2012, 11:27:49 am »
Thanks Girls, I must get around to making some, I'm enjoying the Gippsland Yoghurt with mango and blood orange at the moment.

Offline fundj&e

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Re: Using the Thermoserver
« Reply #8 on: September 18, 2012, 06:38:32 pm »
hello muzzy and welcome to the forum

you can use the TS to keep things cold 2
i don't need a recipe i'm italian

Offline Cuilidh

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Re: Using the Thermoserver
« Reply #9 on: September 18, 2012, 09:35:43 pm »
I just had a thought ... can you use the thermoserver for your bread to rise in?  It might be a good answer in these cold months.  Anyone tried this?
Marina from Melbourne and Guildford
I can resist everything except temptation - Oscar Wilde.

Offline Wonder

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Re: Using the Thermoserver
« Reply #10 on: September 18, 2012, 10:05:53 pm »
Aussiebrenda, I strain our yoghurt for a few hours after leaving in the thermoserve overnight. We're not fond of the texture when it's first made but love the creaminess you get after straining. I only get 500gr yoghurt from 1 ltr of milk though.

Offline Tan

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Re: Using the Thermoserver
« Reply #11 on: September 19, 2012, 03:56:40 am »
I just had a thought ... can you use the thermoserver for your bread to rise in?  It might be a good answer in these cold months.  Anyone tried this?

yes - absolutely - i use the thermoserver to assist in the bread rising - works well,

 :)
Tan

Offline Mlnjaq

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Re: Using the Thermoserver
« Reply #12 on: September 19, 2012, 09:18:33 am »
LOL the thermoserver was so well insulated that when i put my bread dough in to rest in a warm place (on top of my espresso machine) the outside got warm and the inside stayed cool.  For me it didn't really work for raising bread!

Offline Cuilidh

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Re: Using the Thermoserver
« Reply #13 on: September 19, 2012, 09:21:12 am »
I had thought of warming the thermoserver up with med-warm water, drying it then just putting the dough in and leaving it on the bench or somewhere like that, I hadn't thought of putting it on a heat source (no matter how gentle the source is).
Marina from Melbourne and Guildford
I can resist everything except temptation - Oscar Wilde.

Offline Mlnjaq

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Re: Using the Thermoserver
« Reply #14 on: September 19, 2012, 10:29:15 pm »
Has anyone used the Thermoserver for defrosting?  I will probably get slammed for this but yesterday I popped some chicken thighs into the oval Thermoserver with the lid on to see how well it defrosted during the day.

When I got home from work the meat was defrosted, the inside of the bowl was cold - meat temp was 8.5.  Cutting the meat was still bone chilling.

I probably should be more organised and do it in the fridge but using the Thermoserver seemed better than leaving on the bench.

Thoughts?