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Topics - Katiej

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1
Starters and Snacks / Sweet & Spicy Carrot Hummus
« on: January 21, 2018, 01:00:21 am »
This has been my go-to dip lately.  Everyone I have offered it to loves it.
I adapted the recipe from a recipe on a blog called "Bowl of Delicious" and converted it to TMX.
Its nice as a dip, or in wraps with chicken and salad etc.

Sriracha is a popular spicy chilli sauce that can be purchased from most supermarkets.

Sweet & Spicy Carrot Hummus

2 small to medium carrots (approx 150g), roughly chopped
1 clove garlic
1 x 400g can chickpeas, rinsed and drained
30mls olive oil
20mls lemon
10mls maple syrup, or more to taste
25mls Sriracha hot sauce, or more or less to taste
1 teaspoon cumin powder
Pinch of salt and pepper
Water

Add carrots and garlic to TMX bowl, chop 5 seconds speed 6
Scrape down sides of bowl
Add all other ingredients except water
Blend 10 seconds speed 8
Scrape down sides of bowl
Add Ĺ to 1 tablespoon of water
Blend 10 seconds speed 8
Scrape down sides of bowl
Taste and adjust if necessary (add whatever you think is needed - more cumin, lemon juice, Sriracha, salt & pepper etc)
Add a tiny bit more water if the consistency is too thick
Blend 10 seconds speed 8
Refrigerate
Garnish with sesame seeds, sunflower seeds and a drizzle of Sriracha

2
Bread / Halloumi and Mint Bread
« on: November 22, 2015, 01:18:07 am »
Halloumi and Mint Bread

This is based on a recipe from Paul Hollywoodís ď100 Great BreadsĒ book.  Itís a traditional Cypriot bread.

I served it with lamb chops, Greek salad and grilled halloumi.
I think it would be nice served with a BBQ or with a hearty soup in winter.

You could replace 100g of the white bakerís flour with 100g of white or wholemeal spelt flour if you like.

I think you could also replace around 50g of the halloumi with a stronger cheese like parmesan, for a stronger cheese flavour.

Ingredients:
300g warm water
40g olive oil
2 teaspoons dried yeast
500g white bakerís flour
1 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons dried mint
250g halloumi (crumbled into pieces 1 to 2 cms in size)

Place all the ingredients (except the halloumi) into the TMX bowl.  Donít let the salt touch the yeast.
Knead for 3 minutes
(check the dough whilst kneading and add a little more water if required)

Add the halloumi and knead for another 2 minutes.  The halloumi will break up a bit and be incorporated into the dough, but you will still be able to see small pieces of cheese thoughout.

Place the dough into an oiled bowl, cover with gladwrap and leave until it doubles in size, about an hour.  Or leave it in the TMX until it doubles in size.

Tip the dough onto a surface that has been sprinkled with flour and semolina.  Knead it by hand a bit and then shape into an oval.

Place the shaped dough onto a tray lined with baking paper and leave it again to double in size (1/2 to 1 hour).

Preheat the oven to 220 degrees.

Place the bread into the oven.  Put a small tray of water in the bottom of the oven, to help generate steam.

Bake for 30 minutes. 

Remove the tray of water from the oven and take the bread off of the baking tray and place the bread back into the oven, just on the oven rack (without the tray) and bake for a further 10 minutes or until itís cooked.

Using Chookies method of checking if the bread is cooked - use a digital thermometer to ensure the internal temperature of the bread is more than 200 degrees Fahrenheit.



3
Bread / Overnight Sour Dough
« on: November 02, 2015, 04:23:38 am »
Overnight sour dough

This is my take on sour dough bread, a method I came up with using everything Iíve been taught by our wonderful bread queen Chookie and from what Iíve read online, especially on the blog ďFig Jam and Lime CordialĒ.

 
Around lunch time take your starter from the fridge and feed it

After dinner, the starter should be active and bubbly

Place 200g of the active sour dough starter into your TMX bowl
Add in this order:
280g water
500g white bakerís flour
1 teaspoon salt

(If you want a spelt loaf, add 250g white bakerís flour & 250g wholegrain spelt flour, increase water by 20g)

Knead for 2 minutes
(check the dough whilst kneading and add a little more water if required)

Leave the dough in the TMX bowl and wait an hour
Knead for another 2 minutes

Place the dough into a large bowl, cover with gladwrap and leave on your kitchen bench overnight.  (I sprayed my bowl with olive oil spray to ensure the dough didnít stick).

The next morning the dough should have risen nicely. Tip the dough onto a surface that has been sprinkled with flour and semolina.  Shape into a ball, or oval or whatever shape youíre going for.

Place the shaped dough into a floured banneton or onto a baking tray lined with baking paper and leave it for a couple of hours, until it has risen again.

Preheat the oven to 240 degrees.

If the dough is in a banneton, tip it out onto a baking tray lined with baking paper.
Spray the top of the dough with water and slash the top with a knife.

Place it into the oven.  Put a small tray of water in the bottom of the oven, to help generate steam.

Reduce the temperature to 220 degrees and bake for 30 to 40 minutes. 

Reduce the temperature to 175 degrees, remove the tray of water from the oven and take the bread off of the baking tray and place the bread back into the oven, just on the oven rack (without the tray) and bake for a further 10 minutes.

Using Chookies method of checking if the bread is cooked - use a digital thermometer to ensure the internal temperature of the bread is more than 200 degrees Fahrenheit.


You can also cook the bread in a cast iron pot if you like (instead of on a baking tray):

Place a large cast iron pot (lid on) into the oven and preheat to 240 degrees.  Make sure that your cast iron pot (and any handles) can take that high temperature Ė some have plastic handles that canít go into a really hot oven.

After the pot has been in the oven for 30 minutes, slash the top of the dough with a knife, then carefully using oven gloves pick up the dough using the baking paper and place it into the pot, put the lid on and place the pot back in the oven. Reduce the temperature to 220 degrees and bake for 20 minutes. 

Be careful the pot and lid will be very hot, donít touch them without a thick oven glove or you will burn yourself

After the 20 minutes, take the lid off the pot and bake for another 20 minutes with the lid off.

Be careful the pot and lid will be very hot

Reduce the temperature to 175 degrees, take the dough out of the pot and place the bread back into the oven, just on the oven rack (no pot or tray etc) and bake for a further 10 minutes.

Check the bread is cooked using a digital thermometer (as above).

Be careful the pot and lid will still be very hot

4
I made this brown sugar sweet potato cake yesterday using the Chip.

It's an interesting recipe, as you grate the sweet potato and then cook it slightly along with the brown sugar, white chocolate and butter. The finished cake has a lovely caramel flavour.

I topped it with lemon cream cheese icing. All I did was whiz cream cheese, the juice of half a lemon and a tablespoon of icing sugar.  I really like the contrast of sweet cake against the not very sweet lemony cream cheese.

The cake is delicious.  Most of the cake is headed to Mum's place today, otherwise I will just eat it all.

Linked JD




5
Richard made this for our dinner tonight, using the chip.

His review is "hooray I made a new recipe and I didn't stuff it up!"

As we don't really like thin broth like soups, he added a can of creamed corn and reduced the amount of water he added accordingly. Other than that he said he followed the recipe.

It was really delicious and I went back for seconds. A quick and easy dinner.

We only received the new book a couple of days ago, but at first glance there a quite a few easy & tasty dinner recipes that he should be able to make.
Linked CC

6
My DH Richard made this for our dinner last night.  He's decided he wants to try more new recipes and more recipes from the "chip", so he decided to make this.

He doubled the recipe as it's quite a lot of effort to go to, to make a pie with only 2 serves (and we like to have left overs to have for lunch the next day).

Double the recipe worked well.  It did seem to take a long time to make and it made an enormous amount of dishes - maybe this is a "boy thing" and doesn't reflect on the recipe.  I certainly think it's quicker and easier to make a shepherd's pie the traditional stove top way.

The lamb mixture was very tasty and the bean mash was a lovely and a nice change to the traditional potato topping.  We both enjoyed it (although it was a chore cleaning up afterwards!).

Linked JD


7
I made this recipe for our dinner on Sunday night from the chip.  It looks a fairly "boring" recipe in the book, but I was looking for something easy and healthy.  It's quite easy to make and I do enjoy using the chip every now and then.

I steamed some broccoli in the Varoma tray whilst the chicken was cooking.  I also used my faithful TM31 and steamed some basmati rice and some green beans whilst the chicken was cooking in the TM5.  I then layered it all in a Thermoserver and added the sauce.  DH was taken aback that the sauce was so green!  I think it needed the rice and the addition of the other vegies.

I really enjoyed it.  DH enjoyed it too, but said it wouldn't be in his top 10 meals I cook (probably too healthy!).
DH seems to always score our dinners as to whether they'd make the top 10!

Linked JD
 

8
I made this soup on Sunday and we had it for dinner last night and also for lunch today.

I had to ask Judy for some rosemary from her garden, as I've managed to kill our rosemary plant!
The recipe uses lamb neck chops, cut in half - but still with the bone it (the bones are removed once cooked).  I decided to discard the bones prior to cooking as I didn't really want bones being stirred around in my TMX and also my DH really dislikes meat with bones (so much so, you have to remove all bones from his sight!).  The recipe says to use 2 small parsnips, but I only used 1 - I think this was enough for our tastes as they are quite sweet.  I also added a chilli.

We both really enjoyed it.  A lovely recipe for the cold weather we are having.

Linked JD


9
I made this yesterday, as I needed some for another recipe in the book.

I could only find a 250g bottle of White balsamic vinegar at my supermarket (the recipe asks for 500g). I decided to use 250g and just make half the recipe, as I only needed a tablespoon of it for the frozen strawberry mousse I was making.

As I was doing half the recipe I reduced the time from 30 minutes in Varoma to 20 minutes. I probably should have reduced it further, as my reduction was a little further reduced and thicker and sticker than it probably should have been.

It says there are several other recipes in the book that use this as an ingredient, so it might be handy to have on hand.

Linked JD

10
This recipe is From Cooking For Me and You, 2nd edition page 130

Had the inlaws over for lunch today and we had this for dessert. It was a good dessert to do as it could be made beforehand.

I made the white balsamic reduction and the strawberry mousse yesterday. The mousse then goes into the freezer until you need it. I made the cream cheese topping this morning and this goes into fridge until you're ready to serve. The topping is spooned over the frozen mousse just prior to serving.

It was easy to make and everyone loved it. A great recipe.

Linked JD


11
I made this today using the recipe on the Australian TM5 chip (using lemon juice instead of vinegar as in the UK version).
Richard loved it, I quite enjoyed it and it was a nice change to the other salads I make.

I'm enjoying using the recipe chip on the TM5, makes following a recipe very easy.

12
This recipe has been on my to-do list for ages.  I actually bought the can of pears months ago to make it, but only got around to it yesterday.

It's an easy recipe to follow.  It's very rich and you can only eat a small piece at a time.  The book says to serve it warm with cream, but I think I prefer it cold.  I really liked it.

When DH came home from work yesterday he took a look at it and said uhm what's that?  He reluctantly tried it, but declared it not to his taste and that it was way too "gingery".  He also doesn't like pears, so I don't think he was ever going to like it.  I've cut it up and stashed it in the freezer, for a treat for me.
Linked CC

13
Bread / Chookie's sourdough ciabatta
« on: December 13, 2014, 06:19:41 am »
I think Chookie's ciabatta recipe disappeared during the server change over. I made it today using the recipe on her blog.

I started feeding my starter yesterday, so by this morning it was nice and active and full of big bubbles. I made the dough and did the knead, rest, knead, rest, knead this morning. I then went out for a family lunch and when I returned the dough had nicely doubled in size.

Here they are just out the oven, the crust is lovely and they smell great. I'll be back later to advise how they taste. They do look a bit rustic, but all my bread does!


14
I made this dessert on Friday night for our Taste of Tassie dinner. I choose it as I wanted something with apples & honey (both abundant in Tassie). It has 5 layers, but each layer was easy and I made a couple of things in advance.

First layer was Apple compote - it was quick and easy to make.

Second layer was custard - I had problems here as the custard is made with cream, egg yolks, vanilla and sugar (no cornflour). After I'd made the custard it was very runny, but I followed the instructions and placed it in the fridge to chill and firm up. After hours it was still runny and wasn't going to set, so I placed it back into Thermie with some cornflour. I must have heated it on too high a temp as it split. I chucked it away and made the thick and creamy custard from the automatic recipe in the TM5 chip.  This custard was too firm, but it didn't matter and no one noticed (except me).

The next layer was green apple sorbet - the sorbet was lush and tasted wonderful in its own, unfortunately I thought it's flavour was lost in amongst the other flavours in the finished dessert.

Next layer was butterscotch foam - OMG! You make heaps of this as you need to fill one of those foam/cream guns to get the "foam" effect. I had to tip the rest of it away yesterday, to stop me eating it straight out the fridge.

On top was cake crumbs - made by making a spiced honey cake, blitzing it into crumbs and then drying them out in the oven. It seemed a bit of a waste to me to turn a lovely cake into crumbs, but it worked and gave texture to the finished dessert.

Everyone loved it! Unfortunately you can't really see all the layers in my photo.


15
From the title, this recipe sounds to me like it's from the 70's!

I made it for dinner during the week. It was quick and very easy to make. I thought it might be a little bland, so I added a glove of confit garlic, a big teaspoon of Dijon mustard and some chilli flakes.

I served it with rice. It was nice, but just nice - it didn't have a wow factor. Not sure I'd make it again.
Linked CC

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